By Carrig Side

By Carrig Side-11/05/2021

By Tom Aherne

Welcome back to your church from Monday April 10, all mass ceremonies will be open to the public. Due to Covid 19 restrictions the numbers in attendance  at Mass is limited to 50 at each gathering. If it is possible  for you to attend  a day mass  in lieu of the weekend mass (Saturday/Sunday) please do so, in order to facilitate people who are working during the week and therefore can only attend at the weekend. Thank you for your patience and understanding at this time.

The Ardagh/Carrigkerry sacristan’s collection will be held on Saturday/Sunday, May 15/16. Both Bernard and Mary have done great work keeping both churches ship shape over the past year, with all the extra work involved due to Covid-19 guidelines.

Sympathy is extended to Theresa and Cathal O’Sullivan and family, Carrigkerry on the death of Theresa’s father Denis (Dinny) O’Sullivan, Ballintubrid, Newcastle West on Monday, May 3, peacefully at his residence surrounded by his loving family. Predeceased by his wife Mary, parents Con and Josie and sister Eileen. A private Funeral Mass was celebrated in Monagea Church on Wednesday, May 5, followed by burial in Monagea cemetery.  He is survived by his daughters, Theresa and Julianne, sons-in-law Cathal and Mike, sister Mary, brother Paddy. Grandchildren Criona, Conor, Donagh, Daniel and Molly. brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, nephews, nieces and a large circle of friends and neighbours. May he rest in Peace.

The Old Mill Ladies football club are holding a fundraising  clothes collection on Saturday, June 5. Reusable clean clothes, shoes in pairs, belts, handbags only. No duvets, sheets/towels. More details from Moira McEnery at 086-8110634.

The good news for primary school students is that the annual Kellogg’s GAA Cul Camps will be held again this year in line with all the government guidelines, from June 28 to August 27. For all the details on the Kellogg’s Cúl Camps see www.kelloggsculcamps.gaa.ie

The Ardagh Development Association and Saint Kieran’s GAA joint weekly lottery draw took place on Monday, May 3. The numbers drawn were 10,12,25, and 26, and there was no winner of the €5,500 Jackpot. Congratulations  to the five lucky dip winners who received €40 each: Nicky Kelly, Duncaha, Kate Ambrose,  Liskilleen, Jim Geaney, c/o Josie, Geraldine O’Keeffe c/o Timmy Madigan and Eddie O’Mahony, Churchtown, Newcastle West. Next Monday night’s jackpot will  be €5,600. People can play online using club force on the club’s Facebook page, with 6pm on Monday evening the deadline. The tickets are also on sale at the usual outlets, and all support will be appreciated.

Creeves Celtic held their split the pot draw on Monday, May 3. Congratulations to Shane Scanlon  who won €110 The weekly entry fee is €2, with €1 going to the club and the other €1 to be paid out in prize money each week. The envelopes to place your two euro in plus details, are available at  Hanley’s Food Store Creeves,  and from committee members.  People can also sign up by standing order for €9 per month. The  draws will be held on Monday nights, and all support will be appreciated.

The next West Limerick 102fm draw will be held on Friday, May 14, at 12.45 pm on the Exchange show. The tickets cost €2, and they are available from volunteers, in local shops, (including Moloney’s Carrigkerry, and Denis Greaney’s Shop Ardagh) or from the radio station. All support will be appreciated as finances are tight due to lack of fundraising. The radio station is off limits to members of the public at present, with only volunteers allowed access. When restrictions are lifted all will be very welcome to visit and get involved in programming. A number of exciting new programmes are in the pipeline for later in the year. The station can be contacted at 069-66200 if people have news of interest to the West Limerick area

Wednesday, May 12 is the one hundred anniversary of the shooting of three young men at Gortnaglanna near Knockanure  in North Kerry. The brutal execution of Flying Column fighters Paddy Dalton,  Jerry Lyons and Paddy Walsh by the Black and Tans is still recalled and spoken about. A number of ballads were written about the event which helped to keep the incident fresh in the minds of people, and plans were in place to mark the centenary, but had to be postponed  due to Covid restrictions.

West Limerick was associated with the atrocity because Paddy Dalton was from Athea  a few miles from the Kerry border. Growing up we heard the older generation speak and discuss this terrible incident from the dark days of our history. Relations of Paddy Dalton lived around my locality which created more interest about it each May when commemorations were held at the roadside monument. Today  May, 12, let us join with them in remembering the great sacrifice he made for Irish freedom.

Recently I came across the following piece  about a Rooska West man in a local newspaper from 1988, which I would like to share. The death has taken place of Jeremiah  Murphy recently in New York at the great age of 101. He was the son of Patrick and Johanna, and he had received his education  from  the famous teacher William Danaher at Clash School in Athea. He worked as a farm labourer with Paddy William Flanagan from Killoughteen, Newcastle West after leaving school.

In time he decided to emigrate to the USA and was due to sail on the ill-fated Titanic on its maiden voyage.  After his nephew Maurice Greaney suggested to him to postpone his sailing until a later date, fortunately Jeremiah did that and had a great escape, as the ship hit an iceberg on the night of April 14/15, 1912, with approximately 1,500 people drowned. One of those who died  in the disaster was  Maurice O’Connor of Ballyloughane, Carrigkerry.

Jeremiah later sailed in a ship  of the Cunard Line, and he worked in the New York Fire Department. He married Catherine McCarthy, formerly  of Sugarhill, Templeglantine, and they had five children, three girls and two boys. Two of the girls entered the convent in New York and were professed as nuns. During his 76 years in New York Jeremiah paid one visit home in the early  1960s. He is survived  by his five children who all live in New York. Jeremiah was an uncle to the well known and very popular Paddy Murphy, and Nell King who live in Rooska West. Since then both Paddy and Nell have also departed this life and may they all rest in Peace.

Con Colbert Remembered       By Tom Aherne

CON COLBERT was shot on May 8, 1916 for his part in the fight for Irish freedom. Last week we brought his story up to the night before his death. David Smith wrote the following lines about Con’s last night, before his execution.

Con Colbert’s Farewell

Farewell my lovely Moanlena, I’ll not see you more,

Farewell to Athea also, Where I lived in days of yore,

My Bible to my sister I leave, my comfort through the years,

Do not sigh or do not weep, for the Lord will wipe away all tears,

Do not visit me, in this place, it would grieve us both to touch,

For I pass away at dawn of day for a cause I loved so much,

These three buttons I also leave, from my uniform-worn proud,

For I have nothing else to give, and await my funeral shroud,

When you hear the awful shots, around the heavens roll,

Say ‘An Ave’ for my comrade’s dear, and their departed souls.

The British soldier who was ordered to pinion him, asked for the privilege of shaking his hand. Together with Michael Mallon, Sean Huston, and Eamon Ceannt, Con was shot in Kilmainham Gaol at daybreak on May 8, 1916 and buried in quicklime in a mass grave in Arbour Hill Prison.

Such was the noble, and dignified death of the brave young Volunteer from West Limerick, who died as he lived, a soldier and a saint. Con had his own definite opinion as to where his duty lay- to God and to his country. He went that way regardless of censure, no matter what the source, and so he lived and died happily.

Around the heart fires in the homes among his native hills and valleys, of Athea they still speak of Con with love and reverence, and the passing years have but helped to mellow the honour and respect with which his name is spoken. Colbert Street, and the Community Centre, is named after him.

The people of Athea erected a beautiful hall in his memory which was officially opened by President Erskine Childers on January 20, 1974. His name over the door and the tricolour flying high ensures that he will never be forgotten, for the part he played in Ireland’s fight for freedom.

A plaque was erected on the gable wall of the farmhouse, where he was born at Moanlena, the inscription reads,

Hero and Martyr enrol his name in a scroll of fame, in letters of Purest Gold.

A monument dedicated to the memory of Con Colbert, one of the executed leaders of the 1916 Easter Rising, was unveiled beside the Con Colbert Hall Athea, on Saturday October 24, 2015. The unveiling was performed by his great-niece Aide Colbert Lennon, who traced the Colbert family history around Athea, during her address. Aileen Dillane was the MC, and the event was organised by West Limerick Republican Monument Committee. A good crowd was in attendance, and the afternoon was dry apart from a few light showers.

The location of the Plaque was amongst the trees and placed on the elevated pathway wall. The special guest speaker was Sinn Fein President Gerry Adams, who praised Con’s involvement in the Easter Rising, and spoke about the current position in Northern Ireland. A highlight was Johnny Mullane’s song about Con and Athea. Short extracts from his final letters to relatives were also read out. A lovely exhibition compiled by the children was on display in the Hall, and refreshments were provided there also.

Con Colbert is still associated with Limerick Railway Station, and a new book was  published about him by John O’Callaghan. That year Con was very much in the limelight as Ireland marked the centenary of the 1916 Easter Rising. A full limestone statue of Con, crafted by O’Connor’s, was unveiled at the gable wall in Moanlena, by Mayor of Limerick Liam Galvin, and by his granduncle Con Colbert on Sunday May 8. The oration was delivered by John O’Callaghan, historian and author of the book about Con.

A bronze bust of Con, crafted by Jarleth Daly was unveiled by his granduncle Con Colbert in Athea village on Sunday September 25, 2015. The oration was delivered by widely known Timmy Woulfe. It was part of a Commemoration Weekend and a lot of events were held to mark the centenary of his death. I will conclude with a few lines I put together about a man whose favourite phrase was for my God and my country.

CON COLBERT

For the way you loved your fellow man

For the way you fought and never ran

For the way you fought away all crime

And stood on guard all the time.

For all your deeds so gallant and brave

For the way you loved and the way you gave

For the way you walked in the light of God

And prayed each day to our almighty Lord.

Every Limerick man will remember you

For all the brave deeds you did do

When you died all Limerick was sad

For you were the bravest soldier we ever had.

Five years later on May 12, 1921 another Athea man Paddy Dalton was shot by the Black and Tans at Gortnaglanna. Paddy Dalton was born on February 23, 1986 in Coole Athea, son of Michael and Hanora White.  He was educated locally and went into employment  as a hardware assistant in Listowel. Paddy became  a member of the North Kerry Brigade of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) and participated during the  War of Independence (1919–1921).

The most famous ballad of the events is Bryan Mac Mahon’s “The Valley of Knockanure”, written in 1946. In memory of Jeremiah Lyons, Patrick Dalton and Patrick Walsh, murdered by Crown Forces at Gortnaglanna, Co. Kerry on  May 12, 1921.

There was Walsh and Lyons and Dalton, boys, they were young and, in their pride,
In every house in every town they were always side by side,
The Republic bold they did uphold though outlawed on the moor,
And side by side they bravely died in the Valley of Knockanure.

The film titled “The Gortnaglanna Tragedy”  by Leo Finucane was shown in the Con Colbert Hall Athea on November 9, 1979, and at other parish halls around the locality. Captain Paddy Dalton’s name is kept alive in Athea  with the naming of Daltons Terrace on May 16, 1971 on the 50th anniversary commemorations a plaque was placed on the corner house. Another  film about the events was made in 2009, and a couple of books have been written  recently to mark the 100 anniversary which is today.

 

 

 

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By Carrig Side-04/05/2021

By Tom Aherne

The death has occurred of Stephen Nolan, 14 The Cross, Ardagh,  on Sunday, April 25, peacefully, surrounded by his loving family. Stephen, the beloved husband of the late Emily (née Brouder). In accordance with government guidelines, a private family funeral Mass was held in St Molua’s Church, Ardagh, on Tuesday, April 27, at 11.30am, followed by burial afterwards in the local cemetery. We extend our sympathy to daughters Kathleen, Jacqueline and Christine, sons Anthony and Vincent, sons in law, daughters in law, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, his sisters Anne, Bridie and Mai, nieces, nephews, sister in law, brother in law, cousins, wide circle of friends and neighbours. May he rest in Peace.

A sincere thank you from Kathleen, and Tony for your contributions  to the annual  sacristan’s  collection which was taken up on the Palm Sunday  weekend in Coolcappa/Kilcolman parish. They are very grateful for your support. Tony Liston retired from the role in Coolcappa at the end of 2020, and has been replaced by Mary O’Donnell Coolcappa. The Ardagh/Carrigkerry sacristan’s collection will be held on Saturday/Sunday May 15/16.

The Old Mill Ladies football club held their annual general meeting on Thursday, April  22, by Zoom. Chairperson Triona Ambrose welcomed everyone, and all the reports were dealt with. Officers elected for the coming year were Chairperson Triona Ambrose,  Vice-Chairperson Timmy O’Donoghue, Secretary Deirdre Ambrose, Ass-Secretary Moira McEnery, Treasurer Margaret Upton, Ass-Treasurer Tommy Carr, PRO Moira McEnery, Child Welfare Officer-Jill Liston.

The mentors for the playing season were finalised as follows: U-8/U10: John Doyle, Seamus Callahan,  Moira McEnery and Tony O’Connor. U-12: Tommy Carr, John Doyle, Koran Carr, U-14: John Liston, Tom Byrne,  Jill Liston,  Pat Horgan and Ger Brasil, U-16: Michael Murphy, Paudie Kiely and Caroline Kelly, U-19: Pat Lee, Ciara Mann and Deirdre Ambrose,  Minor and Senior: Ivan Neary, Paudie McCarthy and John Brouder.

Limerick Ladies football manager  Donal Ryan has named three members of the Old Mill club in his squad for the forthcoming  Football League, Iris Kennelly, Roisín Ambrose and Sophie Hennessy. The club are holding a fundraising  clothes collection on Saturday, June 5. Reusable clean clothes, shoes in pairs, belts, handbags only. No duvets, sheets/towels. More details from Moira McEnery at 086-8110634. Best wishes to the club for the coming season.

Work is continuing at a good pace on the playground at Carrigkerry village. It is great to see this project at long last come to fruition, and all the children are really looking forward to its completion.

The Con Greaney programme broadcast on West Limerick 102 fm on Saint Patrick’s Day has proved very popular and has been heard in 54 countries around the World. It’s wonderful that his singing is still bringing enjoyment to so many through this medium. For people who may have missed out on the programme, they can still  catch it on podcast, on the West Limerick 102 fm radio Facebook platform.

The recent  dry spell of warm weather dried up the land and bogs around the locality. The turf machines came out in force after Easter and to date a lot of the turf banks have been cut. A few people still cut their winter supply of turf by hand using the old fashioned tools of hay knife, spade, shovel,  slean and pike. This is a better way for the bog to recover, which is left with a fine swart and only the bog hole that the turf has been taken from. The drawbacks are lack of help and it takes a lot longer to cut and afterwards to dry. May  and June are the best month for drying turf with sun and  wind and long days. The bog on a fine day is great for getting a good colour and an increased appetite.

On the eve of May Day in olden times in many districts the father of the house would light a candle and bless the threshold, the hearth and the four corners of the house with Easter water. He also blessed his wife and the children in the order of their age. The farmer then would visit the stable and bless the animals, and one field  to cover the whole farm. The sprinkling of holy water on the growing crops and pasture fields was very general. The purpose of sprinkling the holy water was to preserve the luck of the household for the coming year. The practise is still observed by some people, mainly in rural areas  up to the present day.

The Ardagh Development Association and Saint Kieran’s GAA joint weekly lottery draw took place on Monday, April 26. The numbers drawn were 5,7,22, and 26, and there was no winner of the €5,400 Jackpot.  Congratulations  to the five lucky dip winners who received €40 each: Jamie O’Brien, Ballynacally, Mary Harnett, Ardagh, Maurice Harnett, Liam Liston, Glenastar, and Theresa Downey c/o Sean Downey.  Next Monday night’s jackpot will  be €5,500. People can play online using club force on the club’s Facebook page, with 6pm on Monday evening the deadline. The tickets are also on sale at the usual outlets, and all support will be appreciated. 

Creeves Celtic  held their split the pot draw on Monday, April 26. Congratulations to Basil and Rose Fitzsimons who won €117. The weekly   entry fee is €2 with €1 going to the club and the other €1 to be paid out in prize money each week. The envelopes to place your two euro in plus details, are available at  Hanley’s Food Store Creeves,  and from committee members.  People can also sign up by standing order for €9 per month. The  draws will be held on Monday nights, and all support will be appreciated.

Congratulations to Ronan Costello Tournafulla, who won €225 in the West Limerick 102fm 50/50 draw, held on Friday, April 30. The tickets cost €2, and they are available from volunteers, in local shops, (including Moloney’s Carrigkerry, and Denis Greaney’s Shop Ardagh) or from the radio station. All support will be appreciated as finances are tight due to lack of fundraising. The radio station is off limits to members of the public at present, with only volunteers allowed access. When restrictions are lifted all will be very welcome to visit and get involved in programming. A number of exciting new programmes are in the pipeline for later in the year. The station can be contacted at 069-66200 if people have news of interest to the West Limerick area.

Con Colbert Remembered       By Tom Aherne

LIMERICK LOST a noble and brave son when Con Colbert, was executed in Kilmainham Jail for his part in the Easter Rising on May 8, 1916. Small in stature, and young in years, he was a giant in the fight for Irish freedom and paid the ultimate sacrifice. Con was born on October 19, 1888 at Moanlena, Castlemahon. He had twelve brothers, and sisters, and he was the fourth youngest. His father Michael who was a farmer, came from Athea, and his mother Nora Mc Dermott came from Cooraclare, in county Clare. Michael Colbert was a former rebel who had taken part in the Fenian uprising in 1867.

When Con was about three years old the family moved to Gale View House Templeathea, Athea, where he attended the local National School. He was taught the usual subjects reading, writing, maths, geography, grammar, and drawing. Con also attended Kilcolman National School for a while, staying with his relatives, the Colbert family in Balliston. He was very interested in local history the Irish language, and in national affairs, as a youngster growing up.

At the age of fifteen years, he went to live in Dublin with his sister, and he attended the Christian Brothers School’s at St Mary’s Place, and O’Connell’s. On leaving school, Con secured employment at Kennedy’s Bakery in Parnell Street, and remained there until 1916. He joined the Irish Republican Brotherhood, and he became very proficient in military drill. In 1909 he joined the Fianna Eireann, at the first meeting, and was soon putting his skill as a drill instructor, to good use by teaching the new recruits.

He gave the Fianna every moment of his time, and during his summer holidays, he would cycle from place to place, getting a few boys together to start a new branch. With his eagerness and youthful enthusiasm, he proved a most successful recruiting agent. Con joined the Irish Volunteers, on their foundation in 1913, and was one of their first drill instructors. He was quickly appointed Captain of F Company 4th Battalion-a rank he held until the Rising.

Despite his youthful age, he shortly became one of the inspirations of the new and vigorous resurgence movement and in due course, he was appointed to Volunteer Headquarter Staff. During the years which preceded the fateful Rising of 1916, Con devoted every moment of his spare time, to the work of organising the men, and boys, who were to participate in that historic event. Con wrote poems, as well and signed them with the pen name An Claidheamh (The Sword).

He spent every penny he had of his hard-earned money in the advancement of the movement, to which he had given everything but his soul. Padraig Pearse spoke lovingly of Con, and all the help he gave him as drill instructor at Pearse’s Scoil  Eanna. Con was offered a salary for his services but declined as he saw his work as being a contribution to the national cause. Con was not a big man being just over five feet tall.

Madge, a sister of his comrade-in-arms, Edward Daly from Limerick knew Con very well as he used to call to their house, coming from Dublin, on the way home to Athea. She recalled he was bright and cheerful and always in good humour. So spiritual was he, that he abstained from meat during the seven weeks of Lent, and he was always slipping away to say his prayers in some Dublin Church.

He would visit her uncle also, who was an old Fenian, like his own uncle, who was a member of the Fenian Brotherhood. They would discuss events until the small hours, and Con wrote him a short note before he was executed. Madge said he was highly thought of by all the leaders.

Tom Clarke held him in high esteem, Eamonn Ceannt, loved him and was forever singing his praises, Padraig Pearse, trusted him as a friend and comrade. Their last meeting was a week before the Easter Rising, when they shared tea, and a long chat in O’Connell Street, Dublin.

Con was calm and happy talking of the risks, as part of the day’s work, in the cause for which he lived.  He said that he believed they would all go down in the fight, but the sacrifice would be well worth it. He was in the highest spirits when he left Madge, glad of the opportunity to play his part in the struggle.

When the fighting broke out in 1916, Con had command of one of the outposts of the South Dublin Union at Watkins Brewery in Ardee Street. The number of men under his command was about twenty. After two days of fighting, he was ordered to move his men, to reinforce a large outpost at Marrowbone Lane. This garrison with the others under the command of Eamonn Ceannt and Cathal Brugha, won immortality both for bravery and strategy. They shattered and drove off large forces of experienced English troops, commanded by Sir Francis Vane.

The order to surrender came as a great blow to the men and Con, whose youth and subordinate command could have saved him. He stepped into the place, of an older man who had dependents and suffered in his place. After the surrender, the agents of Dublin Castle made sure that Con was singled out for execution. The reason for this special treatment can be found in his activities, as an organiser of the national movement prior to 1916.

Con did not send for any of his relatives to visit him in jail, as he felt that visit would grieve them too much. He wrote a number of letters to his brothers, and sisters, and relatives and friends. Writing to his sister on the eve of his execution he said: ‘’Perhaps I’d never get the chance of knowing when I was to die, and so I will try and die well. I received this morning and hope to do so again before I die. After asking his sister to have Masses said for him, he continued: ‘’May God help us-me to die well- you to bear your sorrow, I send you a prayer book as a token.

Today we remember Con on his 105th anniversary. I will continue his story in next week’s newsletter.

 

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By Carrig Side-27/04/2021

By Tom Aherne

The death has taken place of Patrick O’Connor, Main Street, Ardagh,  peacefully at UHL, on Tuesday, April 20. In accordance with government guidance a private family Funeral Mass took place in Saint Molua’s Church, Ardagh, on Friday, April 23 at 11.30am, followed by burial  in the local cemetery.  We extend our sympathy to  his brothers Michael and Christopher, sisters Catherine Moran (Toureendonnell, Athea) and Mary Boyce (Granagh), brothers in law, sisters in law, nephews, nieces, neighbours relatives and  a large circle of friends. May he rest in Peace.

The death has taken place of Sheila O’Regan, Dromrahnee, Ardagh, Co Limerick and formerly of Hearnsbrook, Killimor, Ballinasloe, Co. Galway. Sheila died suddenly at her residence on Thursday, April 22, predeceased by her much-loved brother, Brendan. In accordance with government guidelines a private family Funeral Mass took place in St Molua’s Church, Ardagh on Saturday,  April 24 at 11.30am, followed by burial afterwards in the local cemetery. We extend our sympathy to her  husband Willie, sons Brian and Cian, daughter Emer, brothers and  sisters Frances, Catherine, Noel, Austin, Willie, Joe, Michael, Martin and Grainne, daughters-in-law Annie and  Danielle, son-in-law John, grandchildren, nephews, nieces, relatives, neighbours and a large circle of friends.  May she rest in Peace.

Congratulations and best wishes in the future to Claire Heffernan, Kilrodane, Ardagh and Neil Stokes who were married  recently. Claire is a teacher in Monagea National School and is a widely known performer  in Comhaltas circles.

The Limerick Leader Focus on Photographers has been running on the back page of their weekly paper since Covid-19 hit us a year ago. Bridie Murphy from Glenastar, Ardagh was featured last August, and last week her son Kevin featured to become the first two photographers from the same family to feature. When it comes to taking  award winning photos both Bridie and Kevin have got it clicked.

The Limerick GAA Club draw for April was  held on Saturday, April 24, during the Limerick Live Sports Show from 10-11am. Congratulations to Gary Thompson joined with  the Saint Kieran’s club  who won the exclusive 5th star prize of A Weber Spirit 11 E 320 GBS Gas Barbecue  plus €250 worth of free utensils. The next draw will be held on Saturday, May 29. The top prizes each month are €10,000, 2nd prize €3,000, 3rd prize €2,000, 4th prize €1,000.  There  is also an exclusive 5th star prize each month. There are  four prizes of €500, four prizes of €250, and 17 prizes of €100. The total prize money each month is €21,000. The Saint Kieran’s GAA Club would welcome new members, and subscription can be paid through the Clubforce App.

All fundraisers at present are virtual due to the Covid-19 pandemic and details are available on their social media sites. The Great Limerick Run will take place over the May Bank Holiday weekend (May 1-3) with different distances to run jog or walk to choose from. Alzheimer’s Tea Day will take place on Thursday, May 6, and people can sign up and donate in support. The annual Darkness into Light  event in aid of Pieta House will take place on Saturday May 8. Participants can walk run or hike 5km in their own time and place in support.

The Ardagh Development Association and Saint Kieran’s GAA joint weekly lottery draw took place on Monday, April 19. The numbers drawn were 3, 18, 22 and 24 and there was no winner of the €5,300 Jackpot.  Congratulations  to the five lucky dip winners who received €40 each:  Maeve Enrigh,t online, Noreen Noonan, The Commons, Ardagh, Olga Mills, New Zealand, online, Helen Byrnes, c/o Denis Greaney, Ivan Neary, Ardagh.  Next Monday night’s jackpot will  be €5,400. People can play online using club force on the club’s Facebook page, with 6pm on Monday evening the deadline. The tickets are also on sale at the usual outlets, and all support will be appreciated.

Creeves Celtic held their split the pot draw on Monday, April 19. Congratulations to  Gavin Wilmott, who won €115. The weekly   entry fee is €2, with €1 going to the club and the other €1 to be paid out in prize money each week. The envelopes to place your two euro in plus details, are available at Hanley’s Food Store Creeves,  and from committee members. People can also sign up by standing order for €9 per month. The  draws will be held on Monday nights, and all support will be appreciated.

The next West Limerick 102fm draw will be held on Friday, April 30, at 12.45 pm on the Exchange show. The tickets cost €2, and they are available from volunteers, in local shops, (including Moloney’s Carrigkerry, and Denis Greaney’s Shop Ardagh) or from the radio station. All support will be appreciated as finances are tight due to lack of fundraising. The radio station is off limits to members of the public at present, with only volunteers allowed access. When restrictions are lifted all will be very welcome to visit and get involved in programming. A number of exciting new programmes are in the pipeline for later in the year. The station can be contacted at 069-66200 if people have news of interest to the West Limerick area.

 

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