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News-24/05/2017

Participants in the Community Games at Páirc na nGael on Sunday last

Community Games Sports Day

Athea Community Games wishes to thank all the children who took part in the Sport Day last Sunday.  It was a very enjoyable afternoon with children competing in running races as well as numerous novelty events.  Many thanks to all who helped out on the day and on Saturday evening with marking out the field .  Thank you also to the GAA for the use of their field and to Paul Collins and Rose’s  shop for sponsoring all the treats for the children.  The children who qualified for the county finals in Mungret – June 24th &25th – will be notified in the coming weeks.

Jim and Peg Prendeville inspect an old steam train in Pine Creek NT Australia

Ladies Monthly Night Out

The Ladies monthly night out will now take place on Friday, May 26th at Brown Joe’s. This will be our final night before the summer break. Jules will be performing a Neil Diamond tribute on the night and food will be served at 9pm sharp.

We will be back again in September.

Joe Aherne, Athea

Walking for Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital, Crumlin

Combining 3 walks

First walk on May 20th, a 50mile challenge in Sneem, Co. Kerry.

Second walk on June 10th, a 50 mile challenge in Moylagh, Co. Meath.

Third walk, a 23 mile walk from Ardagh to Listowel on August 5th to include a 3 mile loop in Athea. More information on this walk nearer the time.

Joe can be contacted on 086-8155614. Donations gratefully accepted for this worthy cause as Joe’s grandson is being treated there at the moment.

Athea N.S. Annual Collection Athea National School annual church gate collection takes place this weekend May 27th/28th at both masses. Your support would be very much appreciated.

Fair Play and Politics

Domhnall de Barra

A split has occurred between rural and urban Dáil deputies about the proposed changes to the existing drink driving laws. Well, there is no change proposed in the legal limit but  anyone found with more than that in their system will be treated the same as somebody who is falling down drunk. They will be disqualified for years and face a hefty fine as well. At the moment there is a sliding scale and anyone who is just above the limit will receive a fine and penalty points or maybe a short suspension for the first offence. I think this is fair. Let me state straight away that I am opposed totally to anybody driving who has drink taken but common sense must come into platy as well. A friend of mine went to a dinner party recently and had a  glass of wine with her meal. She had no intention of having any more drink that evening as she was driving and was well aware of the law. She got a phone call from her baby sitter that her little girl was in some distress and so she left the party and drove for home. There was a Garda check point on the road and she was asked to take a breathaliser test. She blew into it with confidence and was most surprised when the Garda told her it was positive and she had to take a blood test. This showed that she had  2 milligrams over the legal limit of 50. This is as borderline as you get but she was prosecuted and received a fine of €400 and 5 penalty points with six months disqualification. This is harsh but under the proposed changes she would have been in court and disqualified for at least two years. Does the punishment fit the crime? Those who favour the changes say that it is a matter of saving lives and that there must be a suitable deterrent. If we follow that logic then anyone caught doing 61 mph in a 60 limit area should face the same fate or to take it to the ridiculous should cars be banned altogether since they are the cause of so many deaths. People with a milligram or two over the limit are no danger to the public, It is not that long ago  since it was deemed safe for a person to drive after having three pints and the equivalent. The biggest problem on the road is speed, not drink driving. That is not to minimise it. Anyone who deliberately drinks and drives should be taken off the road. What I am arguing for is a little common sense in dealing with people who are on the limit but posing no danger. The law should be fair and deal with offenders according to the severity of their actions.

The race for the Fine Gael leadership is off and may be over as soon as it started. Leo Varadkar has stolen a march on his rival Simon Coveney by getting a number of high profile people to back him straight away. Many others who might have supported Simon held their powder until they saw which way the race was going and when they saw the momentum was with Leo they jumped on the band wagon for fear of being left out when the jobs are being doled out after the election. This is politics –  look after number one !  The race is not over yet because the councillors and party members around the country still have to vote. They don’t have the same fears about being left out of the cabinet so they may vote in a different way. They would need to go for Simon Coveney in a big way to change the tide and as it stands Leo Varadkar looks almost certain to win. Whoever gets the captaincy is facing a tough task. There are huge problems facing the country and Fianna Fáil are waiting in the long grass for the right moment to pounce. In the meantime there are thousands  without suitable accommodation and thousands more on waiting lists to see consultants and get into hospitals. The leader will change but will anything else?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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News-17/05/2017

Benny Thade McCarthy, Duagh, presenting a Cheque of €8,025 to The Friends Of St. Ita’s Hospital, Newcastlewest proceeds from a fundraising dance that was held on St Patrick’s Night in The Railway Bar, Abbeyfeale, pictured with the committee of St. Ita’s Hospital

Rambling House

Benny Thade McCarthy Finial rambling house of the season will take place on Monday night, June 5th this is a fundraising night for Dromcollogher Respite Centre which was recently renovated. All singers, musicians, dancers and storytellers welcome doors open at 8.30 and show begins at 9 please come along and show your support for such a worthy cause. For more information contact Benny on 0879918546

Dromcollogher & District Respite/Care Centre is a purpose-built single storied centre incorporating a three-unit twenty-bed residence. It was established by huge voluntary local community effort in conjunction with various statutory bodies and many generous donors to help meet a growing need in our society at the present time. The Centre provides short-term care for senior citizens within the general catchment area of Limerick and North Cork.

Benny will Resume again on the first Monday night in September. Thank you for all your support since last October.

Peg Prendeville with her son Sean on Mothers Day in Australia

Athea Community Games

Athea Community Games will have there athletic day on Sunday, May 21st at Athea GAA pitch at 2pm.  Races for preschool, u6 to u16, long puck and novelty races. All are welcome and anyone who can help out on the day would be much appreciated.

Athea CCE

Church gate collection this weekend Saturday 20th/Sunday 21st May at both masses. Your support, as always, would be greatly appreciated.

Ladies Monthly Night Out

The Ladies monthly night out will now take place on Friday, May 26th at Brown Joe’s. This will be our final night before the summer break. Jules will be performing a Neil Diamond tribute on the night and food will be served at 9pm sharp.

We will be back again in September.

Joe Aherne, Athea

Walking for Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital, Crumlin

Combining 3 walks

First walk on May 20th, a 50mile challenge in Sneem, Co. Kerry.

Second walk on June 10th, a 50 mile challenge in Moylagh, Co. Meath.

Third walk, a 23 mile walk from Ardagh to Listowel on August 5th to include a 3 mile loop in Athea. More information on this walk nearer the time.

Joe can be contacted on 086-8155614. Donations gratefully accepted for this worthy cause as Joe’s grandson is being treated there at the moment.

St. Vincent de Paul Ballybunion Holiday

The St. Vincent de Paul society are organising a one week stay in Ballybunion from June 15th to 23rd this year. For more details on this please contact 087-6216255

Rehab Collection

Sincere thanks to all who contributed to our Church gate collection last weekend. The amount raised was €545.

AFTERNOON TEA DANCE 

The last of the tea dances for this season takes place at Fr. Casey’s Clubhouse on Sunday, May 21 with dancing to Noel Cronin.  Funds raised go to Abbeyfeale Parish Community Garden.

DOG SHOW AT ABBEYFEALE TOWN PARK 

The annual Dog Show takes place at the Town Park from 2pm on Sunday, May 21.  Twelve classes, twelve winners compete for best in show.  €2 per class.  Enjoy the new zip line, freshly painted playgrounds, river side and woodland walks.  Bring all the family, maybe not the cat though.

WEST LIMERICK RADIO  

The Board of Management of West Limerick Radio would like to advise all stall holders and customers that the car boot sale has been discontinued due to its rapid decline over the past 12 months.  They would like to thank all those who supported it over the past 12 years.

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News-10/05/2017

The County Limerick Under 14 Cross Country Relay Team

Dermot Pierse with his gold medal for the U14 Cross Country relay team.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Athea Community Games

It was a successful day at The National Sports Centre in Abbotstown for the first weekend of the Community Games finals with five children from Athea representing County Limerick.  It is a great achievement for a child to compete at a national level and it is only after dedicated and continuous hard work and training.  Congratulations and well done to Clodagh Ahern, Sarah Morrisey and Aoibhinn Morrisey who all competed in the Gymnastics final.  Anne-Marie Pierse represented Limerick swimming 50 meters Butterfly in the Under 16 category and Dermot Pierse qualified to run 800 metres as part of the Limerick Under 14 Cross Country relay team.  After winning their first heat the Limerick Cross Country relay team fought a tight battle in the final race but they managed to get first over the line and secure a gold medal for the county.  Congratulations to Dermot and the rest of the Limerick team on such an outstanding success.

CD LAUNCH

Donie Lyons from Dromreask, Glin will launch his new CD The Lovely Banks of Blaine at Barrett’s Bar Glin on Sunday May 14 at 3pm.

A Very Important Month 

Domhnall de Barra 

The month of May is one of the most important in the old Irish calendar. May 1st is one of the quarterly days and is associated with many customs and traditions. As in much of northern Europe, May Day in Ireland, was a celebration and welcome of the summer. Here, it is rooted in the pre-Christian festival of Bealtaine. Bealtaine embraces the summer, bidding farewell to the dark winter half of the year. Flowers, dancing and bonfires featured strongly in the festivities. People also sought protection for themselves, their homes and livestock against supernatural forces. On May eve it was customary to sprinkle holy water on the land, crops and animals to ward off those with the “evil eye” who, it was believed, had the power4 from the devil to take the produce for themselves. “Pisheógs” was the name given to those who practiced the black arts. Pisheog is translated as “superstition”  and I suppose much of what went on was in the mind of people who lived in fear of a particular individual. You wouldn’t hear much about it now but, when I was a lad, it was rife in the locality. We all knew of certain families who were supposed to have the power and we lived in fear of them. My mother was a strong believer and could recall many an event to back it up. My father, on the other hand,  was more sceptical and used to make fun of her fears until something happened to put a question or two in his mind. He had his own lorry and one day he did a job of shifting stones for a family who were suspected of  practicing pisheógs. Although they had only a small holding their barns were always full of hay and they had many more cattle than the land could sustain. My father had no fears about working for them despite my mother’s warnings. From the day he took the load of stones things started to go wrong. The lorry kept breaking down for no apparent reason, work dried up and he found himself unable to make any money. This went on for a few weeks until one day my mother decided to clean out the cab of the lorry. There was an old cushion on the driver’s seat, cloth covering a honeycomb sponge. When she lifted it up she found an egg underneath.  She took the egg, doused it in holy water and threw it down the mountain as far as she could. She also gave the lorry a good dousing for good measure. From that day on things were back to normal, the lorry stopped breaking down and there was plenty of work to be done. Maybe it was all a big co-incidence but who knows?  A neighbouring farmer had such bad luck that he almost was wiped out. Milk would go sour, calves would die and the hay would rot in the stack and the shed. One of the men who worked there told me that when they were drawing in the hay there would be eggs found in the cocks. They also found a salmon and pieces of  bacon. Eventually they had to bring in a priest who said a special Mass on the farm and again their luck changed and they never again looked back.  These are just a couple of incidents but there are people in this parish with many more tales to tell. To this day people will spread the holy water about on May Eve, just in case somebody is still practicing.

Since medieval times in Ireland, there has been a strong association with the devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary during the month of May. Much of the traditions associated with May have been incorporated into the Marian processions found throughout the country.  To this day “The Queen of the May” sung by Fr. Sidney McKeon, is broadcast on Radio 1  on May 1st.   Flowers also played a big part in the May customs. The flowers were placed on the doorsteps of houses and on windowsills. They were believed to offer luck to the house and offer protection from pisheogs and bad fairies. It was believed that the fairies could not enter the home as they could not pass such sweet smelling flowers. May was also a time of celebration with many festivals. Many towns and villages had May bushes which were decorated and in village centres a Maypole was often erected. This had brightly coloured ribbons attached to it and young people danced around the pole. The festivities were often accompanied by the lighting of bonfires, another very old tradition.

In summary, May Day in Ireland was a festival to welcome the summer and to protect the family and livelihood of the farm from supernatural forces. It was a festival celebrated with flowers, fires and dancing and had strong links to the same holiday celebrated throughout northern Europe.

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